Hanna-Barbera Comics: Best & Worst

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TheBlueHombre
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Postby TheBlueHombre » Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:17 am

zavkram wrote:I never read much of these adaptations when I was a kid... I remember seeing a few of the Charlton versions of Yogi Bear and The Flintstones and thinking, at the time, about how ugly the characters looked in those.

Sorry to go OT here, but for me the Gold Key Bugs Bunny comic books were a different story... I always enjoyed those. In fact, I think many of those comic book stories would be excellent for adaptation as new Looney Tunes cartoons.

The Harvey Comics that Rodinei posted with the covers were all reprints of the Charlton Comics. Harvey only did one original Hanna-Barbera comic that was published and that was the live action Flintstones movie adaptation.

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Leviathan
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Postby Leviathan » Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:50 am

Do you know what's the best part about those comics covers above this post?

Scooby Doo is nowhere to be found.
"The Fudd of Intellect will never capture the Wabbit of true Vision"- Rafi Zabor, Introduction to the Book of Leviathan :bugs2: :befuddled

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bj_wanlund
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Postby bj_wanlund » Wed Jan 14, 2009 3:02 pm

I thought Harvey did a bang-up job with the MB comic reprints as well as the Jetsons comic reprints.

I must be the only one who doesn't hold the older comics companies in that high regard, due to the advancements in paper (i.e. from matte paper to glossy).

BJ

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Ray Pointer
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Postby Ray Pointer » Wed Jan 14, 2009 5:00 pm

I used to like the Gold Key Hanna-Barbera comics, and had a collection of each of their characters at one time. I probably have only two or three now, including the JONNY QUEST issue#1 that was the comic book version of the TV pilot, THE CASE OF THE LIZARD MEN. I also have the 25c special edition of YOGI BEAR'S BIRTHDAY SURPRIZE with the heavier cover.

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larriva9/11
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Postby larriva9/11 » Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:30 pm

zavkram wrote:Sorry to go OT here, but for me the Gold Key Bugs Bunny comic books were a different story... I always enjoyed those. In fact, I think many of those comic book stories would be excellent for adaptation as new Looney Tunes cartoons.


*Not* the Road Runner. (Though that probably would have been the "approved" Saturday Morning incarnation in the 70s, with a few sanctimonious moral messages thrown in for good measure...)

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MarkTheShark
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Postby MarkTheShark » Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:37 pm

TheBlueHombre wrote:The Harvey Comics that Rodinei posted with the covers were all reprints of the Charlton Comics. Harvey only did one original Hanna-Barbera comic that was published and that was the live action Flintstones movie adaptation.


I kind of wish I had been paying more attention when those came out, because I didn't realize they were reprints of the Charltons at the time.

Even back in the 1970s, I felt like the Charltons weren't as good as the Gold Keys (and I guess that's saying something). Still, they had a style and charm of their own. I remember being excited when Marvel started a Hanna-Barbera line...it seemed like a really weird thing, since I only knew Marvel for superhero comics. Interesting how each publisher came up with their own style of "logos" for each series based on a show or character (I think I've seen Marvel's versions used on some other licensed merchandise in relatively recent times). Oddly, Gold Key and Charlton used the same title design for Scooby-Doo.

I remember seeing Hanna-Barbera's name on all these comics as the copyright owner...so it was probably a simple thing for Harvey to reprint the Charlton stories once they had a license.

I have a vague memory of having some cheap plastic toy "TV set" (this was in the mid-1970s or so). It was one of those toys you'd see at a grocery store checkout, and it had two rollers and you could "scroll" through a Hanna-Barbera cartoon, reprinted from the Charlton comics. They also had a Warner Bros. one, using the Gold Key comic adaptations...and it had a sticker that had a copyright notice for "WARNER BORS. (sic)"

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MarkTheShark
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Postby MarkTheShark » Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:46 pm

Daws Butler Jr. wrote:I like that one alot, but I think I have a tie for my favorite books... "Yogi Bear Visits the U.N." and "The Flintstones Go To the World's Fair". I read both of those a million times when I was a kid.


That World's Fair one...I had two versions of that (both were found at flea markets in the 70s). One had a 1964 date and the other 1965. I was under the impression that this was not an annual event, right?

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MarkTheShark
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Postby MarkTheShark » Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:59 pm

Dell Comics Fan wrote:Ruff & Reddy also appeared in Gold Key's BANDWAGON and GOLDEN COMICS
DIGEST #2, 7 and 11 (the digest stories were all reprints).


That reminds me of an odd thing I wondered about all those years ago, but never thought to ask anyone...most of those "digest-type" comics reprinted old material, right? But in the case of Golden Comics Digest (which was an anthology series featuring a different character, or characters from a different studio in each issue), I was under the impression that it was a mix of old and new. The only example I can cite and know what I'm talking about is the Banana Splits...there were three Golden Comics Digest issues that featured the Splits (alongside other H-B characters), and none were reprints from any of the eight Gold Key Banana Splits issues (and the one March Of Comics to feature them was not a reprint either). It just seems strange to me that they'd commission new material for the digests...but I don't know a whole lot about how Western Publishing operated...maybe it was standard operating procedure.

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larriva9/11
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Postby larriva9/11 » Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:23 pm

MarkTheShark wrote:That World's Fair one...I had two versions of that (both were found at flea markets in the 70s). One had a 1964 date and the other 1965. I was under the impression that this was not an annual event, right?


It did run both years. Much like the earlier one ran in 1939 and 1940.

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Studio Toledo
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Postby Studio Toledo » Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:24 pm

TheBlueHombre wrote:I have a good H-B collection from all of the publishers, so here's my rankings:

1. Marvel
1. Archie
3. Comico (for both the Jonny Quest line and the one shot Space Ghost special)
4. Dell
5. Blackthorne (Flintstones in 3-D)
6. Gold Key
7. Harvey
8. Charlton
9. DC

I rank Harvey higher than Charlton because the covers were outstanding. Even though the material inside were reprints of the Charlton run, the covers on the Harvey line were excellent.

Also, Harvey did a great job on the 1994 Flintstones movie adaptation. The comic came with 3-D glasses. If you looked at it one way, you had the John Goodman version of the film. If you looked at it with a different color, you had the cartoon Fred and Barney. Reading the comic adaptation with the cartoon Fred and Barney made the story much, much better (Trust me).

Blackthorne did a quarterly publication of the Flintstones in 3-D with black and white art. It was gorgeous to look at it and very well done.

I kick myself in the hinder on many occasions since I had lost that issue I once had of that! :(

Being reminded of the one issue of Dell's Huckleberry Hound I had to beg my mom to fork over $20 for at a comic shop some 23 years ago, which I still have to this day!
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